"Tx Say What gave me the courage to advocate for an important issue in my own community."

-Gabriel Kauachi

Junior

The Student and Youth Work Hard Against Tobacco (Say What) movement is funded by the Texas Department of State Health Services through a contract with the Texas School Safety Center (TxSSC) at Texas State University. Say What is the official statewide youth tobacco prevention coalition. 

Each year, depending on the grants provided by the TxSCC, members are selected to join the team in the fall and must attend a one-day spring seminar and a four-day summer conference. Say What Bloodhounds currently consists of thirteen trained students from 9th through 12th grade who are selected by the Moderator based on demonstrated interest, character, talent, healthy living, and good academic standing. Say What Bloodhounds must be responsible and respectful students, who uphold high moral standards, and are willing to speak or perform in front of an audience.

Say What Bloodhounds are involved in a number of activities on campus and in the community. The team is responsible for educating the middle school students on the harmful dangers of nicotine through the CATCH Curriculum and classroom discussions. During the March prevention week, members make intercom announcements on facts related to the dangers of nicotine. In addition, members are responsible for putting on a youth-led campus-wide assembly. In the community, members will assist in nicotine awareness and prevention projects assigned by the moderator. 

The goal of TX Say What! Bloodhounds, along with many other youth from across the state, is to unite in raising awareness on the dangerous effects of tobacco and e-cigarette usage and the addictive nature of nicotine.

Moderator

Photograph of Vilma Wolfe
Vilma Wolfe
Counselor 7th & 8th Grades, College Counselor, PPLT Moderator, Say What Bloodhounds Moderator
Staff

“Tx Say WHAT was an amazing experience. It was a lot of fun and very informative. I was very impressed with all the presentations, but the one about nicotine addiction made the biggest impact.”

-Max Castillo
Sophomore